How Long Does Opiate Withdrawal Last?

If you’re struggling with opiate addiction, the fear of withdrawal alone can be enough to make you hesitate to get clean. How long does opiate withdrawal really last? Is there an effective treatment for opiate withdrawal?

The physical effects of withdrawal from opiates may last only a few weeks, but the mental effects can drag on for months. Luckily, there are treatments available that can help you escape the worst of your withdrawal symptoms.

Physical Symptoms of Opiate Withdrawal

The physical symptoms of withdrawal from opiates typically begin about 12 to 30 hours after you last use opiate drugs, depending on which type of drug you were using. The early physical symptoms of withdrawal are extremely painful, and include anxiety, muscle aches, runny nose, watery eyes, agitation, sweating, abdominal cramps, insomnia, dilated pupils, nausea, goose bumps, vomiting and diarrhea. If you were to quit cold turkey, you’d experience your worst opiate withdrawal symptoms during the first five days after quitting.

By week two, many people quitting opiates experience a significant reduction of their withdrawal symptoms. If your addiction was quite severe, you may continue to experience withdrawal symptoms going into the second week. Most likely, however, your opiate withdrawal symptoms in the second week will be limited to confusion, inability to concentrate, impaired judgment and anxiety.

By the third week of withdrawal from opiates, your physical symptoms should have subsided – but during this period, many people report feeling intense cravings for opiates. Your brain has not yet healed from the damage done by opiate addiction – it can take months for full healing to occur. In the fourth week of opiate withdrawal, your physical symptoms should have subsided, but mental symptoms like depression and a feeling of fogginess can persist for months after you quit taking opiates.

You Don’t Have to Suffer Opiate Withdrawal

Fortunately, modern treatments for opiate addiction have advanced to the point where you can quit taking opiates without going through a full-blown, painful withdrawal. You have a couple of options.

The first option is rapid detox. This is a good option for people who have a short history of opiate addiction and are high-functioning. When you choose rapid detox, you’ll be put under general anesthesia and given naloxone, a drug that flushes all the opiates out of your system at once and puts you into full opiate withdrawal.

Don’t worry – you’ll be asleep for it! By the time you wake up, the worst of your opiate withdrawal symptoms will have passed. You may still feel foggy and may have some mild physical effects – you’ll want to schedule your procedure so you can take a few days off work afterward.

The second option is Suboxone treatment to manage your opiate withdrawal symptoms. Suboxone is an opiate maintenance drug, an alternative to methadone. It’s ideal for treating opiate withdrawals because it’s a partial opiate agonist – it stimulates your brain’s opioid receptors enough to relieve your opiate withdrawal symptoms, but not so much that you get high. If you try to abuse Suboxone, it won’t work – and if you try to take other opiate drugs while on Suboxone, you won’t get high.

Suboxone’s low potential for abuse means that you can take a supply of the drug home with you – you won’t have to make time to go to a clinic every day to get your medication or risk going into full opiate withdrawal. It’s prescribed by a doctor in the privacy of a primary care office. You can take this opiate withdrawal medication in the privacy of your own home, at a time that suits you, and no one needs to know that you’re taking it if you don’t want them to. With Suboxone, you can begin to feel “normal” again right away – as soon as the first day of treatment.

As your Suboxone treatment progresses, you’ll gradually lower your dose a little each day, until you can finally stop taking Suboxone altogether and have minimal, manageable opiate withdrawal symptoms.

If you’re struggling with opiate addiction, you have options. Don’t quit cold turkey and suffer full opiate withdrawals. Call us today at 888-415-0708 to learn more about our opiate addiction treatment programs.

What to Expect After Your Florida Rapid Detox Treatment

When you receive our Florida rapid detox treatment for opiate addiction, you’ll be put under general anesthesia and given drugs to induce full opiate withdrawals. You’ll go through withdrawals while you’re under anesthesia, so when you wake up from your Florida rapid detox treatment, the worst of your withdrawal symptoms will be over. You may feel groggy after your Florida rapid detox treatment, and you may still feel some lingering but mild aftereffects of opiate detox. Here’s what you can expect in the days, weeks and months following your Florida rapid detox treatment.

When You First Wake Up from Florida Rapid Detox

When you first wake up after your Florida rapid detox procedure, you could still be feeling a little groggy from the effects of the anesthetic. We’ll keep you under supervision until it’s clear that you’re fully recovered from the affects of the anesthetics and other drugs administered during your Florida rapid detox procedure. In terms of withdrawal symptoms, you’ll feel as if you were about three weeks into a cold turkey detox. In other words, your Florida rapid detox procedure will get you through the worst of withdrawals.

You may have some physical symptoms, like diarrhea, following your Florida rapid detox procedure. These symptoms are the result of your body re-adjusting from the affects of having been on opiates for so long. You should plan to take a few days off work for your Florida rapid detox, so you can be fully recovered when you return. Many of our patients plan their Florida rapid detox procedure for Friday morning, so they can spend the weekend recovering, and get back to work feeling like their old selves again on Monday morning.

In The Weeks and Months Following Your Florida Rapid Detox

You may feel some extended withdrawal symptoms in the weeks following your Florida rapid detox treatment. These symptoms can include depression, increased sensitivity to stress, clouded thinking, trouble concentrating, anxiety, panic attacks and increased sensitivity to pain. These symptoms are part of a syndrome known as post-acute withdrawal syndrome, or PAWS.

Unfortunately, many people recovering from opiate addiction experience PAWS symptoms. Our Florida rapid detox program can’t protect you from PAWS symptoms. Your chances of developing PAWS, and the severity of your symptoms, will depend upon how long and how heavily you abused opiate drugs before entering our Florida rapid detox program. PAWS symptoms improve over time as your brain heals from the physiological damage of opiate addiction. If you experience PAWS symptoms after Florida rapid detox, they will peak at around three to six months after your treatment ends. If you are worried about experiencing PAWS symptoms after Florida rapid detox, ask about PAWS-specific treatment options.

Taking Care of Yourself After Florida Rapid Detox

After your Florida rapid detox treatment ends, it’s important to practice good self-care and to seek addiction counseling. Florida rapid detox can end your physical dependence on drugs, but it can’t address the underlying issues behind your opiate addiction, nor can it give you the coping and life skills you need to resist relapse and make the most of your Florida rapid detox treatment. We recommend that all of our Florida rapid detox patients seek comprehensive addiction counseling for at least three months, but preferably up to one year or longer, after going through our Florida rapid detox program.

Following your Florida rapid detox, facilitate your physical and mental recovery from opiate addiction by taking good care of yourself mentally, emotionally and physically. Eat a healthy, nutritious diet full of fruits, vegetables, whole grains and lean protein. You may benefit from taking vitamin and mineral supplements during this time. Many recovering addicts suffer from chronic nutritional deficiencies because heavy substance abuse can seriously hamper your ability to stick to a healthy diet.

It’s important that you eat regularly. You may not be used to eating breakfast, lunch, dinner and snacks on a regular schedule, but it’s vital for your recovery. Low blood sugar from hunger is a key cause of addiction relapse.

Make sure you get enough sleep and exercise regularly. Exercise, especially aerobic exercise, speeds your healing process and can help relieve your PAWS symptoms, if you have them.

If you or someone you love is addicted to opiate drugs, our Florida rapid detox program can be the first step toward wellness. Call us today at 888-415-0708 to learn more.

Delray Detox Methods Work for Opiates, Benzos and More

Are you struggling with addiction to opiates, benzos or other drugs? Need help getting clean? Our Delray detox methods are the gold standard in drug detox. There was a time not so long ago when addiction specialists believed that outpatient detox could never be effective, and rapid detox was merely a thing of fantasy. Our Delray detox methods have proven those outdated beliefs wrong.

Our Delray Detox Methods Can Help You Beat Opiate Addiction

Opiate addiction is one of the toughest addictions to beat, and for good reason. The withdrawal symptom you experience when you don’t or can’t use opiate drugs aren’t life-threatening, but they sure feel that way. Our Delray detox methods can help you kick opiates without going to a methadone clinic every day and without suffering through withdrawal symptoms.

Our Delray detox methods for opiate addiction use Suboxone, a partial opiate agonist that relieves your withdrawal symptoms without getting you high. Because it’s difficult to abuse, you can take a supply of your medication home with you and take it on your own schedule – there’s no need to come into a clinic every day and no one needs to know that you’re taking advantage of our Delray detox methods for opiate addiction.

How do our Delray detox methods for opiate addiction work? You’ll see our physician, Dr. Rodriguez, and receive an initial dose of Suboxone that should be sufficient to ease your withdrawal symptoms completely. You’ll need to be in withdrawal when you arrive for your initial consultation, or our Delray detox methods won’t work the way they ought.

Our Delray detox methods dictate that you see Dr. Rodriguez regularly and systematically lower your dose of Suboxone. Over time, you’ll wean yourself off of the drug. Eventually, our Delray detox methods will allow you to quit taking Suboxone altogether, with few or no opiate withdrawal symptoms. With our Delray detox methods for opiate addiction you should be able to continue with your normal life as soon as you take the first dose of Suboxone.

Our Delray Detox Methods Can Help You Kick Benzos

Benzodiazepines like Xanax and Valium are some of the most addictive and most difficult to give up. Try to detox from benzos too quickly, and you risk serious medical complications like seizures as well as prolonged withdrawal symptoms. Our Delray detox methods can help you beat your addiction to benzos without risking serious or long-lasting side effects.

Our Delray detox methods for benzodiazepines require you to be stabilized, often on a benzodiazepine that’s different from what you’ve been taking. Your exact detox drug will depend on your health, age, and benzodiazepine of choice. Your dose will be slowly tapered down over a period of a few weeks. Our Delray detox methods are longer than some, but they allow you to take your detox at your own pace. Our Delray detox methods are tailored to avoid the kind of damage that can occur with a too-quick detox. Your dose of detox medications can be adjusted in order to give you more functionality on a particular day of your detox.

Our Delray Detox Methods Are Effective for Alcohol, Stimulants and Other Drugs

No matter what kind of substance you need to detox from, our Delray detox methods can help. Need to detox from alcohol? With our Delray detox methods you’ll have the supervision you need to detox safely from alcohol and avoid the serious medical complications that can arise during alcohol detox, like life-threatening seizures.

Need to detox from Ritalin, Adderall, other prescription stimulant drugs or cocaine? Our Delray detox methods can be tailored to your needs. We’re responsible for pioneering the detox methods that are now accepted and common throughout the addiction treatment industry.

You should never try to detox on your own at home without a doctor’s supervision. When you’ve developed a physical dependency on drugs, stopping their use suddenly can be dangerous. Even if there’s no risk of physiological complications, you could still experience mental side effects, like suicidal thoughts and behaviors, which could be quite harmful.

If you’re ready to experience our Delray detox methods for yourself, call The Delray Model today at 888-415-0708 to learn more.

What to Expect in Opiate Withdrawal – And What You Can Do About It

If you’re like many opiate addicts, the fear of going through withdrawals is probably one of the biggest reasons why you haven’t yet quit. Maybe you’ve tried to quit before, without success. Maybe you’re wondering what to expect in opiate withdrawal – what are the physical symptoms? How long do they last? Are they life-threatening? Let’s take a closer look at what to expect in opiate withdrawal.

What to Expect in Opiate Withdrawal – Phase 1 or Acute Withdrawal

When most people ask about what to expect in opiate withdrawal, they’re mostly asking about what to expect in opiate withdrawal during the initial five days or so that make up Phase 1 of withdrawals, or acute withdrawal. The first phase of opiate withdrawal begins about 12 hours after you take your last dose of opiates. If you’ve been taking methadone, you can expect acute withdrawal to begin within 30 hours of your last dose – methadone is a longer-acting drug than heroin, morphine or prescription painkillers.

Here’s what to expect in opiate withdrawal during the first five days:

  • Insomnia
  • Depression
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Nausea
  • Abdominal cramps

When it comes to what to expect in opiate withdrawal, the symptoms get worse over the course of the first two days. You may not feel very bad at first, but your withdrawal symptoms will quickly become incapacitating. By day two, the answer to the question “what to expect in opiate withdrawal” will include cold sweats, aches and pains, restlessness and fatigue, in addition to the symptoms mentioned above.

Most people who are wondering what to expect in opiate withdrawal want to know how soon the symptoms will begin to subside. The answer to that is, for most opiates, you will begin to feel better by day three, and physical symptoms should be largely absent by day five. If you’re wondering what to expect in opiate withdrawal over the long term, you should know that by day five you will be experiencing the longer-term symptoms of confusion and mental “fogginess” that can plague some opiate addicts for years.

What to Expect in Opiate Withdrawal – Phase 2

If you’re wondering what to expect in opiate withdrawal after the severe physical symptoms of the first few days, you should know that the second phase of opiate withdrawal lasts about two weeks, during which the brain works to restore a normal balance of endorphins. The list of what to expect in opiate withdrawal during Phase 2 includes leg cramps, goose bumps and chills.

What to Expect in Opiate Withdrawal – Phase 3

If you’re wondering what to expect in opiate withdrawal over the long term, the third phase of opiate withdrawal consists of mostly psychological symptoms like insomnia, anxiety and restlessness. Over the long term, you could experience post-acute withdrawal syndrome, which can include long-lasting symptoms of anxiety and depression, panic attacks, thoughts of suicide and cognitive impairment.

What to Expect in Opiate Withdrawal with Suboxone

If you’re concerned about whether you can deal with what to expect in opiate withdrawal – and if you’re reading this, you are – then there’s something you can do about it. You can use Suboxone, an opiate maintenance drug that contains buprenorphine and naloxone, to relieve your withdrawal symptoms. With Suboxone, there’s no need to spend weeks going through a painful withdrawal process. You’ll taper down your dose slowly over time until you’re able to quit using Suboxone with little to know withdrawal symptoms.

If you’re wondering what to expect in opiate withdrawal with Suboxone, you should know that Suboxone will allow you to get straight back to living your life. There’s no need to worry about what to expect in opiate withdrawal when you detox with Suboxone. The drug works to effectively relieve your withdrawal symptoms, but doesn’t make you “high,” so you can have your wits about you to fulfill your responsibilities. You can even take a supply of the drug home with you, so there’s no need to report to a clinic every day in order to get your medicine.

If you’re worried about what to expect in opiate withdrawal, try Suboxone. Call 888-415-0708 today to get started.